SFAC Member Bios

Students

Atreyi Mitra 

Atreyi Mitra (she/hers) is an aspiring Hufflepuff and currently is a fourth year double majoring in Human Biology and Society & Public Affairs. Besides serving on SFAC and the Bruin Mental Health Advisory Committee, this year she also is creating an undergraduate course on the complexities of regulating assisted reproductive technologies, revising her research paper on the barriers to accessing the CARE offices at the UC, and interning with the Luskin Center for History and Policy. When she's not studying, she enjoys reading, learning, writing her love letters, and fitness. 

 

Member Facts

Q: Why did you join SFAC?
A: From 2017-2018, the two CARE advocates saw 770 clients at UCLA. This was a statistic I painfully repeated dozens of times my sophomore year when I worked alongside others to advocate for the CARE office to get more funding so they can better serve survivors. This painfully complex process and experience taught me about the layers of bureaucracy associated with budget allocation and how students really can make change on campus. And so this experience led me to want to join SFAC for three reasons. 1) I want to amplify marginalized voices of groups and students trying to engage in funding advocacy. 2) If a group, office, or space is in need of space for funds, I want to make my best effort to help them get that. And 3) I believe that we should do everything in our capacity to uplift the offices of those who work to uplift us everyday.  

Q: How have you benefited from participating in SFAC?
A: 
Chairing SFAC ultimately has been a lot more work than I anticipated and has kind of become a part-time job. However, it's the most meaningful work I've ever been tasked with. I still find crazy how much responsibility I've been given as a student. Advising the allocation of nearly $2 million, creating progressive spaces, writing letters to the Chancellor -- wow! Through SFAC, I've had the opportunity to learn so much about compassionate leadership while forming close relationships with a lot of the administrators I've had the privilege to work with (I appreciate you Christine). This committee means everything to me. I get to support other activists while performing my own activism sustainably and for that I am forever grateful. 

  

Q: What issue have you enjoyed working on the most since you joined SFAC?
A: I've particularly enjoyed trying to understand how to be an activist within the confines of bureaucratic spaces. However, I've come to realize that we need to work to create change from within before we can collectively work to make structural change. As a result, I've really come to enjoy create a more accessible, anti-racist, and compassionate SFAC while being as authentic to my ENFJ personality as possible.    

Q: Do you have any advice on student fees or managing finances for other students?
A: For my Bruins involved in funding advocacy. Perhaps the most valuable piece of information that someone gave me was to not just focus on the "why" an office, program, or space should get funded but the "how". Do your research comprehensively and present your findings strategically. You don't need to be a "student leader" to get people to act because of the work you did. If you ever have any questions/comments/concerns relating to student fees, please don't hesitate to reach out to me at sfacchair@saonet.ucla.edu. You and your passion mean something and I want to thank you for your commitment to promoting the well being of students here on campus <3.  

Bradley Alvarado

I'm a 2nd year transfer, 4th year Political Science major with a minor in Global Studies. I was born and raised in Los Angeles in the San Fernando Valley. Since I came to UCLA, I've really been focused on student advocacy, especially for the transfer community. Most of my advocacy work has been through my positions on campus such as co-chair of the Transfer Leadership Coalition (TLC), Director of Finance in the USAC Transfer Student Representative's office, and the appointed UCLA representative on the UCSA Transfer Coalition. A little about me and my interest: I'm a huge Harry Potter and Star Wars fan, my favorite movie is Whiplash, favorite show is Shameless, and I'm a Mint Chip Ice Cream flavor supremacist, it's such an underrated flavor. 

Member Facts

Q: Why did you join SFAC?
A:I joined SFAC because it has historically lacked transfer representation. It wasn't until 2019 that the co-chairs of the TLC worked with the previous chair of SFAC to change the charter and bylaws to allow 1-year terms to fit the transfer timeline. I also joined SFAC to extend my advocacy efforts to more marginalized and underrepresented communities. The racial injustices we have seen this past few months is unacceptable and I thought joining SFAC would allow me to advocate for these communities and attempt to make this committee support and stand in solidarity with our marginalized communities specifically our Black and Brown Bruins who face racial injustices every day. 

Q: How have you benefited from participating in SFAC?
A: 
I believe I benefit from SFAC by learning the institutional knowledge that surrounds the bureaucracy that is UCLA. I've been working hard to learn all this institutional knowledge to help me succeed in all my rolls. I've been fortunate enough to learn so much from my peers but I am still learning about this school and its structure and SFAC has been teaching me many things that I did not know.

Q: What issue have you enjoyed working on the most since you joined SFAC?
A: I look forward to making SFAC a more ant-racist committee and also tackle on the issues entities on campus are facing due to COVID-19. I know there are many issues that were created because of the pandemic and I look forward to discussing how SFAC can help this campus in its time of need.

Q: Do you have any advice on student fees or managing finances for other students?
A: I urge students to focus on all aspects of funding and finances that they are looking at. It's very important to look at the structure, the functionality, and the history behind entities applying for funding. When managing finances for other students, you must always keep in mind that your job is to serve the student body of UCLA and understand their needs and not playing into the bureaucracy of it all. Don't allow your personal beliefs get in the way of making the best decision possible. 

Devanee MatchamDevanee Matcham (she/her/hers) is a fourth-year transfer student majoring in Sociology. She grew up in the Grand Central Valley of California and transferred from West Hills Community College. As an Afro-Latinx transfer student, Devanee focuses her advocacy work on expanding opportunities for marginalized communities through advocacy and prioritization. Throughout her academic career, Devanee has served as a Supplemental Instructor and Tutor, specializing in English language learners, at her community college and served as Rieber Terrace President in her first year at UCLA. Devanee continues to serve marginalized communities by focusing on finding more accessible and affordable ways to help communities and students of color.  

Member Facts

Q: Why did you join SFAC?
A: I joined SFAC because I saw it as a way to help amplify the voices of marginalized communities at UCLA. As this is one of the very first years SFAC is allowing transfer students to serve, I felt that it was important to not only add to transfer representation in UCLA's USAC and SFAC committees, but to start getting transfer students actively engaged in their student funds. It is important to advocate on the behalf of communities that need it the most and SFAC allows me to do just that in the end.

Q: How have you benefited from participating in SFAC?
A: Participating in SFAC has allowed me to understand the different resources provided by UCLA students and distribute that information out to communities that need it the most. As I am working on SFAC, I am able to learn how to be a better advocate and amplify the voices of others by learning from a powerful team of leaders. With the direct guidance and resources SFAC has to offer, I feel that SFAC in the end, will allow me to become a better leader and advocator. 

Q: What issue have you enjoyed working on the most since you joined SFAC?
A: Due to the unfortunate and devastating events of the pandemic, this year on SFAC is going to be much harder to navigate. However, I am excited and looking forward to tackling these issues with the amazing SFAC team this year. I know that I will learn to navigate through this pandemic with the student body and I am committed to being a resource in helping students in this time of need. I am also excited to be able to connect more transfer students to SFAC and introduce them into vocalizing their use of student fees!

Q: Do you have any advice on student fees or managing finances for other students?
A: I would urge all students to utilize student services and resources more because at the end of the day, students are the ones who are paying for them! All students should be on the lookout for these resources as they are there to help. Not only that, but I would advise all students to be vocal about their student fees and research where they are going and who they are going to. 


Samantha SolemnidadSamantha (Sam) Solemnidad is a third year undergraduate student double majoring in Political Science and Asian American Studies. Prior to her time in SFAC, Sam was involved in many spaces on campus including Samahang Pilipino and Southeast Asian Students for Organizing (SEASON). Along with her roles on campus, Sam is active in politics and hopes to one day move to Washington DC and work in government where she can advocate for communities of color on a federal level. While she is a part of SFAC, Sam's goal is to make sure all her work in some way serves the underrepresented and marginalized student groups on campus. 

Member Facts

Q: Why did you join SFAC?
A: I joined SFAC because I wanted to be able to advocate for communities on campus that typically don't hold roles like these. Prior to applying to the role I hadn't really heard of SFAC, but once I learned just how important the committee is to our UCLA community I knew I needed to join.

Q: How have you benefited from participating in SFAC?
A: Being part of SFAC has exposed me to a side of campus I had previously never seen at UCLA. Advocating for students on this level is unlike anything I've ever done before and I look forward to learning more as I continue my role in this committee.

Q: What issue have you enjoyed working on the most since you joined SFAC?
A: During my time on the committee so far, I've enjoyed working with my fellow SFAC members to make sure the funds we allocate in our committee are being allocated in a way that works to make our campus more equitable. 

Q: Do you have any advice on student fees or managing finances for other students?
A: Stay informed! For anyone interested in funding on our campus, make sure you understand what Student Services Fees are and where they're going. Also, since your fees are already going towards different services on campus, make sure to try and use as many as possible to get your money's worth!


Gabriela BarriosGaby Barrios is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. Her research interests include migration and gender as well as the cultural representation of trauma. Gaby is also an elected officer in UAW 2865 (TA, Tutor, Reader and Graders' Union) and is committed to the wholistic representation of graduate students as both students and workers.  

Member Facts

Q: Why did you join SFAC?
A: In the work I do with my union I am in constant conversation with fellow academic student workers at the UC. It is clear that our situation is both impacted by our institutional status as workers and as students. I see my role at SFAC as an opportunity to learn more about the ways in which graduate students' fees can be returned to them in the form of much-needed resources.  

Q: How do you anticipate benefiting from participating in SFAC?
A: It is a great benefit to meet both administrators and students from across campus in a setting that fosters open conversation about the challenges we all face. It has been very eye-opening to be able to lay out graduate student challenges alongside undergraduate student challenges. It is clear that if we work together we can achieve so much for our respective populations.  

 

Jackie Markt-MaloneyJackie Markt-Maloney is a second year Master of Public Health student in Epidemiology. Before starting at UCLA, she worked in community engagement and interned with the advocacy arm of Planned Parenthood. Currently, Jackie is conducting mixed methods data analysis on the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among pregnant and breastfeeding women at risk of HIV in South Africa. Her areas of research interest are sexual and reproductive health, particularly family planning and reproductive health justice.

Outside of her program, Jackie loves the beach, craft beer, history, and roller skating. Her roller derby name, Brawn Burgundy, is inspired by her love of her undergraduate home, San Diego, and movies, like Anchorman. She grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and hopes to work at a health department in California after graduating. She has extensive student leadership experience and looks forward to elevating student voices through her role in SFAC. 

 

Member Facts

Q: Why did you join SFAC?
A: I joined SFAC to represent graduate student voices on the committee. Student input is critical in the budget recommendations SFAC makes to the Chancellor regarding the Student Services Fee.

Q: How have you benefited from participating in SFAC?
A: 
Through participating in SFAC, I have learned more about how UCLA operates and how our student fees are spent.

Q: What issue have you enjoyed working on the most since you joined SFAC?
A: An issue I have particularly enjoyed working on is the impact of COVID on student services and student needs. The committee utilizes university and departmental data to help identify student priorities, particularly related to the pandemic.

Q: Do you have any advice on student fees or managing finances for other students?
A: I encourage students to get involved in campus leadership--we have the power to influence where our fees go!

Laxman Dahal

I am a Ph.D. student in the department of civil engineering. As a first-generation international student, I am passionate about representing and advocating for international and first-generation student communities. Being new to an entirely new place or being the first one in your family to get here, there are pitfalls that can easily be avoided given the knowledge and resources. My interest is to advocate for that bridge for a smooth transition. 

Member Facts

Q: Why did you join SFAC?
A: During my first quarter at UCLA, several on-campus protests introduced me to some funding issues I never thought existed. I joined SFAC to gain a better understanding of how the student fees are used and to voice graduate student's needs. 

Q: How do or have you benefited from participating in SFAC?
A: Participating in SFAC has allowed me to work with different administrative personnel and policymakers. As an engineer, I am trained to think in a mechanistic manner. Having a difficult conversation about fund allocation and listening to a different point of view has taught me to not be as mechanistic in decision making.  

Q: What issue do you anticipate or have enjoyed working on the most since you joined SFAC?
A: I anticipate reviewing budget proposals and addressing the immense financial burden COVID-19 has brought upon different units across campus.  

Q: Do you have any advice on student fees or managing finances for other students?
A: I would advise all students to make use of a wide range of services available on campus. All the units are there to serve the students and some rely on student turnout to continue receiving funding. 

Paarth is a second-year JD-MBA student at UCLA where he spends his time between the School of Law and the Anderson School of Management focused on technology and real estate. Paarth graduated from Princeton University in 2016 and has since then, spent time working at PwC Strategy&, Cognizant, and Bank of America.

 

Member Facts

Q: Why did you join SFAC?
A: I joined SFAC to give back to a University that has given me so much. I am grateful that the Graduate Student Association thought highly of me to appoint me to this role and I am eager to serve as an advocate for students in recommending where our student fees should be allocated.

Q: How have you benefited from participating in SFAC?
A: 
I've benefited from participating in SFAC by meeting and building friendships with a wonderfully diverse group of individuals from across the campus. I've learned a tremendous amount about how UCLA works and the challenges we face as a Bruin family. 

Q: What issue have you enjoyed working on the most since you joined SFAC?
A: I look forward to engaging in thoughtful and intentional dialogues with our various stakeholders in determining how SFAC can better serve our student body and address issues around sustainability, equity, and access especially as we face unprecedented historical challenges (COVID-19 and the Social Injustice).

Q: Do you have any advice on student fees or managing finances for other students?
A: I'm a personal finance junkie so I'm all about optimizing your financial health and wellbeing. Rather than pontificate, I'll simply say, your personal profit = your personal income - your personal expenses, so look to save more by increasing your income and decreasing your expenses but above all, regardless of however much you have, try to give back (both financially and non-financially). We all have a responsibility to pay it forward!  


 

Campus Representatives

Carina Salazar

Carina Salazar is the Senior Associate Director of UCLA's Career Center, she oversees Undergraduate Career Counseling and Graduate Career Services. Carina is a passionate and committed advocate in higher education with 20+ years of experience whose leadership philosophy is based on a social justice framework. She strongly believes in access and equity for all students regardless of where they are in their career development. Her work at the Career Center is focused on creating a career ecosystem (through collaborative initiatives) that allow students to engage in career development early in their academic career and connecting them to opportunities. In her spare time, Carina enjoys spending time with her family and friends.

Bio: TBD  

Erinn McMahanErinn McMahan is the Director of UCLA Recreation, which provides extensive access to a broad range of wellbeing activities and services. Erinn also works closely with Student Health Education and Promotion (SHEP), including co-administration of the Bruin Public Health Ambassadors program.  Previously, Erinn served as the interim Associate Director of Programs and Outreach for UCLA Recreation where he helped complete the Jane Semel HCI Community Garden and worked to establish evening youth programming and the Little Bruins Clubhouse at the John Wooden Center. 
Erinn is a co-leader of the Semel HCI Center's EngageWell pod and also serves on the NIRSA Health and Wellbeing Task Force.


To Be Determined

Bio: TBD